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Code of Ethics (2010)

Organization: Engineers, Australia (formally, Institution of Engineers, Australia) Visit Organization Page
Source: Code of Ethics Visit Source Page
Date Approved: 
July 28, 2010

Disclaimer: Please note the codes in our collection might not necessarily be the most recent versions. Please contact the individual organizations or their websites to verify if a more recent or updated code of ethics is available. CSEP does not hold copyright on any of the codes of ethics in our collection. Any permission to use the codes must be sought from the individual organizations directly.

Code of Ethics

As engineering practitioners, we use our knowledge and skills for the benefit of the community to create engineering solutions for a sustainable future. In doing so, we strive to serve the community ahead of other personal or sectional interests.

 

Our Code of Ethics defines the values and principles that shape the decisions we make in engineering practice. The related Guidelines on Professional Conduct provide a framework for members of Engineers Australia to use when exercising their judgment in the practice of engineering.

 

As members of Engineers Australia, we commit to practise in accordance with the Code of Ethics and accept that we will be held accountable for our conduct under Engineers Australia’s disciplinary regulations.

 

In the course of engineering practice we will:

 

1. Demonstrate integrity

1.1 Act on the basis of a well-informed conscience

1.2 Be honest and trustworthy

1.3 Respect the dignity of all persons

 

2. Practise compentently 

2.1 Maintain and develop knowledge and skills

2.2 Represent areas of competence objectively

2.3 Act on the basis of adequate knowledge

 

3. Exercise Leadership

3.1 Uphold the reputation and trustworthiness of the practice of engineering

3.2 Support and encourage diversity

3.3 Communicate honestly and effectively, taking into account the reliance of others on engineering expertise

 

4. Promote sustainability

4.1 Engage responsibly with the community and other stakeholders

4.2 Practise engineering to foster the health, safety and wellbeing of the community and the environment

4.3 Balance the needs of the present with the needs of future generations

 

The Guidelines on Professional Conduct provide a framework for members of Engineers Australia to use when exercising their judgment in the practice of engineering.

 

The Guidelines are not intended to be, nor should they be interpreted as, a full or exhaustive list of the situations and circumstances which may comprise compliance and non compliance with the Code of Ethics. If called upon to do so, members are expected to justify any departure from both the provisions and spirit of the Code.

 

Ethical engineering practice requires judgment, interpretation and balanced decision-making in context.

 

Engineers Australia recognises that, while our ethical values and principles are enduring, standards of acceptable conduct are not permanently fixed. Community standards and the requirements and aspirations of engineering practice will develop and change over time. Within limits, what constitutes acceptable conduct may also depend on the nature of individual circumstances.

 

Allegations of non-compliance will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and administered in accordance with the disciplinary regulations.

 

1. Demonstrate integrity


1.1 Act on the basis of a well-informed conscience

a) be discerning and do what you think is right

b) act impartially and objectively

c) act appropriately, and in a professional manner, when you perceive something to be wrong

d) give due weight to all legal, contractual and employment obligations

 

1.2 Be honest and trustworthy

a) accept, as well as give, honest and fair criticism

b) be prepared to explain your work and reasoning

c) give proper credit to those to whom proper credit is due

d) in managing perceived conflicts of interest, ensure that those conflicts are disclosed to relevant parties

e) respect confidentiality obligations, express or implied f) do not engage in fraudulent, corrupt, or criminal conduct

 

1.3 Respect the dignity of all persons

a) treat others with courtesy and without discrimination or harassment

b) apply knowledge and skills without bias in respect of race, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, marital or family status, national origin, or mental or physical handicaps

 

2. Practise competently


2.1 Maintain and develop knowledge and skills

a) continue to develop relevant knowledge and expertise

b) act in a careful and diligent manner

c) seek peer review

d) support the ongoing development of others

 

2.2 Represent areas of competence objectively

a) practise within areas of competence

b) neither falsify nor misrepresent qualifications, grades of membership, experience or prior responsibilities

 

2.3 Act on the basis of adequate knowledge

a) practise in accordance with legal and statutory requirements, and with the commonly accepted standards of the day

b) inform employers or clients if a task requires qualifications and experience outside your areas of competence

 

3. Exercise Leadership

 

3.1 Uphold the reputation and trustworthiness of the practice of engineering

a) advocate and support the extension of ethical practice

b) engage responsibly in public debate and deliberation

 

3.2 Support and encourage diversity

a) select, and provide opportunities for, all engineering practitioners on the basis of merit

b) promote diversity in engineering leadership

 

3.3 Communicate honestly and effectively, taking into account the reliance of others on engineering expertise

a) provide clear and timely communications on issues such as engineering services, costs, outcomes and risks

 

4. Promote sustainability


4.1 Engage responsibly with the community and other stakeholders

a) be sensitive to public concerns

b) inform employers or clients of the likely consequences of proposed activities on the community and the environment

c) promote the involvement of all stakeholders and the community in decisions and processes that may impact upon them and the environment

 

4.2 Practise engineering to foster the health, safety and wellbeing of the community and the environment

a) incorporate social, cultural, health, safety, environmental and economic considerations into the engineering task

 

4.3 Balance the needs of the present with the needs of future generations

a) in identifying sustainable outcomes consider all options in terms of their economic, environmental and social consequences

b) aim to deliver outcomes that do not compromise the ability of future life to enjoy the same or better environment, health, wellbeing and safety as currently enjoyed

Code of Ethics for the Oregon Chapter of the American Fisheries Association

Organization: Oregon Chapter of the American Fisheries Association Visit Organization Page
Source: Code of Ethics Visit Source Page
Date Approved: 
February 1995

Disclaimer: Please note the codes in our collection might not necessarily be the most recent versions. Please contact the individual organizations or their websites to verify if a more recent or updated code of ethics is available. CSEP does not hold copyright on any of the codes of ethics in our collection. Any permission to use the codes must be sought from the individual organizations directly.

Code of Ethics

This Code of Ethics provides principles of conduct to guide the members of the Oregon Chapter of the American Fisheries Society in maintaining ethical relations with the natural and cultural communities they serve and to which they belong. As fisheries professionals, we are obligated to provide clear, accurate, and timely information; to encourage open discourse, both professional and public; and to participate in the debate that results in informed choices by the public. We are also obligated to select for ourselves and to recommend to others courses of action we believe will protect the biological diversity and integrity of aquatic ecosystems.

 

We recognize that the complexity of the physical and biological worlds, compounded by the complexity of social values and conflicting perspectives, often means that all of the alternatives contain costs as well as benefits. Often, none of the alternatives can satisfy everyone, and choosing among them will be difficult and painful to some or all of the interested parties. We recognize that resources are finite, that we share them with all forms of life, and that no one species or group can “have it all.” We also recognize that human culture and quality of life depend on intact ecosystems. Reaching an appropriate level of global sustainability, although it may be achieved with local excess, requires us to take responsibility for educating, studying, and managing for that level of sustainability.

 

People expect management decisions to be based on sound reasoning and scientific information, guided by reasoned judgment, in keeping with principles of conservation and rational use of aquatic resources. Accurate scientific information is critical to sound management. Both the relevant science and the limits of scientific knowledge and understanding must be clearly communicated to decision makers and the public. Another primary role of fisheries professionals is to define management options and the likely outcomes of implementing them. Predicting outcomes of alternatives often contains considerable uncertainty; people need to be made aware of this uncertainty when they evaluate alternatives.

 

Because our knowledge of changes in ecosystems is often coupled with a high degree of uncertainty, reasonable and competent professionals may disagree about the ecological and social consequences of natural resource decisions. We must therefore recognize that the foremost obligation of the fisheries professional is to ensure open, honest discussion of the benefits, costs, risks, and tradeoffs of alternative management actions in balancing scientific principles with the interests of society.

 

Achieving the goals of responsible stewardship and credible science requires that ethical standards be followed by all of us. To that end, each member agrees to follow the principles outlined below:

 

I will work toward maintaining the structure, function, and integrity of aquatic, riparian, and upland ecosystems-the physical surroundings and the complex, interconnected web of life on which fish and other aquatic organisms depend. I will take care in my research to minimize adverse effects to the environment and not kill or injure organisms except when essential for collecting data.

 

I will insist that any use of the aquatic resource promotes ecological integrity and continuity of ecosystems now and into the future. Because human beings are a part of the interconnected web of life, I will consider human needs and influences as integral to the study and management of these ecosystems.

 

I will cooperate with professionals in other disciplines to foster interdisciplinary understanding and to guide research and management toward clarifying the complex interactions that affect fish and other aquatic organisms, as well as the ecosystems on which they depend.

 

I will speak and write honestly and openly about the results of my work, neither hiding or exaggerating their implications. I will explicitly acknowledge my own biases, assumptions, and values that are the foundation of my understanding and interpretation of scientific theories and knowledge. I will be open to the ideas of others and evaluate those ideas with clear recognition of the influence of my own values.

 

In writing and speaking, I will acknowledge the work and ideas of others, whether gleaned from publications, presentations, or conversations.

 

I recognize that my deeply held, professional convictions may conflict with the interests and convictions of others. I am obligated to be clear and honest in distinguishing between reports of results from rigorous study and my professional opinions based on observations or intuition. My professional opinions clearly so identified have value, but must not be put forward as fact. In addition, the temporal, spatial, and contextual limits of my facts and their confidence limits must

be clearly acknowledged.

 

I will distinguish between recommendations based on science and those based on policy, both to avoid confusing the public and to better separate political decisions from aquatic science.

 

I recognize that my professional convictions may sometimes conflict with the policies of my employers. When such conflict arises, I will provide decision makers with full supporting evidence and sufficient time for study and action before I publicly disclose my views. But my commitments to the profession and to ecosystems, including their human components, may compel me on occasion to speak against policies or actions of my employers.

 

I will learn from the wisdom of the past, but I will freely and consistently question all information, inferences, and assumptions that could affect aquatic ecosystems.

 

I will continue to learn throughout my professional life to read, listen, assimilate, integrate, and apply new information as it becomes available. I will follow advances in related disciplines ( other branches of biology, hydrology, geology, sociology, economics, ethics, and politics) that affect fish and aquatic ecosystems so that the value of my expertise does not become irrelevant or overwhelmed by unforeseen influences.

 

I recognize that diversity among my professional colleagues brings differences in perspective, experience, expertise, style, and values to the profession and that these differences are a source of strength and new ideas. I welcome as colleagues people of both sexes, all ages, races, ethnic backgrounds, nationalities, life styles, religions, and physical conditions.

 

I will uphold the highest standards of excellence, integrity, and public service of my profession, and I will do my share to return to the profession the full measure of all that I have received. I will speak and write to people outside of the fisheries profession to help increase their awareness of and interest in aquatic ecosystems.

 

I will serve as a mentor to young people in the profession so that they may learn, care and contribute. I will teach them, encourage understanding of their own and society’s values, and by my own example, help them to develop high ethical standards for research and resource management.

 

APPROVED BY THE OREGON CHAPTER MEMBERSHIP FEBRUARY 1995

Rules of Conduct (1979)

Organization: American Institute of Certified Public Accountants Visit Organization Page
Source: CSEP Library Visit Source Page
Date Approved: 
March 31, 1979

Disclaimer: Please note the codes in our collection might not necessarily be the most recent versions. Please contact the individual organizations or their websites to verify if a more recent or updated code of ethics is available. CSEP does not hold copyright on any of the codes of ethics in our collection. Any permission to use the codes must be sought from the individual organizations directly.

Rules of Conduct

Definitions

 

The following definitions of terminology are applicable wherever such terminology is used in the rules and interpretations.

 

Client: The person(s) or entity which retains a member or his firm, engaged in the practice of public accounting, for the performance of professional services.

 

Council: The Council of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

 

Enterprise: Any person(s) or entity, whether organized for profit or not, for which a CPA provides services.

 

Firm: A proprietorship, partnership, or professional corporation or association engaged in the practice of public accounting, including individual partners or shareholders thereof.

 

Financial statements: Statements and footnotes related thereto that purport to show financial position which relates to a point in time or changes in financial position which relate to a period of time, and statements which use a cash or other incomplete basis of accounting. Balance sheets, statements of income, statements of retained earnings, statements of changes in financial position, and statements of changes in owners' equity are financial statements.

 

Incidental financial data included in management advisory services reports to support recommendations to a client and tax returns and supporting schedules do not, for this purpose, constitute financial statements; and the statement, affidavit, or signature of preparers required on tax returns neither constitutes an opinion on financial statements nor requires a disclaimer of such opinion.

 

Institute: The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

 

Interpretations of rules of conduct: Pronouncements issued by the division of professional ethics to provide guidelines concerning the scope and application of the rules of conduct.

 

Member: A member, associate member, or international associate of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

 

Practice of public accounting: Holding out to be a CPA or public accountant and at. the same time performing for a client one or more types of services rendered by public accountants. The term shall not be limited by a more restrictive definition which might be found in the accountancy law under which a member practices.

 

Professional services: One or more types of services performed in the practice of public accounting.

 

Applicability of Rules

 

The Institute's code of professional ethics derives its authority from the bylaws of the Institute which provide that the trial board may, after a hearing, admonish, suspend, or expel a member who is found guilty of infringing any of the bylaws or any provisions of the rules of conduct.*

 

The rules of conduct which follow apply to all services performed in the practice of public accounting including tax and management advisory services except (a) where the wording of the rule indicates otherwise and (b) that a member who is practicing outside the United States will not be subject to discipline for departing from any of the rules stated herein so long as his conduct is in accord with the rules of the organized accounting profession in the country in which he is practicing. However, where a member's name is associated with financial statements in such a manner as to imply that he is acting as an independent public accountant and under circumstances that would entitle the reader to assume that United States practices were followed, he must comply with the requirements of rules 202 and 203.

 

A member may be held responsible for compliance with the rules of conduct by all persons associated with him in the practice of public accounting who are either under his supervision or are his partners or shareholders in the practice.

 

A member engaged in the practice of public accounting must observe all the rules of conduct. A member not engaged in the practice of public accounting must observe only rules 102 and 501 since all other rules of conduct relate solely to the practice of public accounting.

 

A member shall not permit others to carry out on his behalf, either with or without compensation, acts which, if carried out by the member. would place him in violation of the rules of conduct.

 

* Bylaws section 7.4.

 

Rules

 

Rule 101 -independence

 

A member or a firm of which he is a partner or shareholder shall not express an opinion on financial statements of an enterprise unless he and his firm are independent with respect to such enterprise. Independence will be considered to be impaired if, for example:

 

A. During the period of his professional engagement, or at the time of expressing his opinion, he or his firm

 

1.a. Had or was committed to acquire any direct or material indirect financial interest in the enterprise; or

 

b. Was a trustee of any trust or executor or administrator of any estate if such trust or estate had or was committed to acquire any direct or material indirect financial interest in the enterprise; or

 

2. Had any joint closely held business investment with the enterprise or any officer, director, or principal stockholder thereof which was material in relation to his or his firm's net worth; or

 

3. Had any loan to or from the enterprise or any officer, director, or principal stockholder thereof. This latter proscription does not apply to the following loans from a financial institution when made under normal lending procedures, terms, and requirements:

 

a. Loans obtained by a member or his firm which are not material in relation to the net worth of such borrower.

 

b. Home mortgages.

 

c. Other secured loans, except loans guaranteed by a member's firm which are otherwise unsecured.

 

B. During the period covered by the financial statements, during the period of the professional engagement, or at the time of expressing an opinion, he or his firm

 

1. Was connected with the enterprise as a promoter, underwriter, or voting trustee, a director or officer or in any capacity equivalent to that of a member of management or of an employee; or

 

2. Was a trustee for any pension or profit-sharing trust of the enterprise.

 

The above examples are not intended to be all-inclusive.

 

Rule 102-Integrity and Objectivity

 

A member shall not knowingly misrepresent facts and when engaged in the practice of public accounting, including the rendering of tax and management advisory services, shall not subordinate his judgment to others. In tax practice, a member may resolve doubt in favor of his client as long as there is reasonable support for his position.

 

Rule 201-General Standards

 

A member shall comply with the following general standards as interpreted by bodies designated by Council and must justify any departures therefrom.

 

A. Professional competence. A member shall undertake only those engagements which he or his firm can reasonably expect to Complete with professional competence.

 

B. Due professional care. A member shall exercise due professional care in the performance of an engagement.

 

C. Planning and supervision. A member shall adequately plan and supervise an engagement.

 

D. Sufficient relevant data. A member shall obtain sufficient relevant data to afford a reasonable basis for conclusions or recommendations in relation to an engagement.

 

E. Forecasts. A member shall not permit his name to be used in conjunction with any forecast of future transactions in a manner which may lead to the belief that the member vouches for the achievability of the forecast.

 

Rule 202-Auditing Standards

 

A member shall not permit his name to be associated with financial statements in such a manner as to imply that he is acting as an independent public accountant unless he has complied with the applicable generally accepted auditing standards* promulgated by the Institute. Statements on auditing standards issued by the Institute's auditing standards executive committee are, for purposes of this rule. considered to be interpretations of the generally accepted auditing standards, and departures from such statements must be justified by those who do not follow them.

 

* Ton generally accepted auditing standards are listed in Appendix A, page 43

 

Rule 203-Accounting Principles

 

A member shall not express an opinion that financial statements are presented in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles if such statements contain any departure from an accounting principle promulgated by the body designated by Council* to establish such principles which has a material effect on the statements taken as a whole, unless the member can demonstrate that due to unusual circumstances the financial statements would otherwise have been misleading. In such cases his report must describe the departure, the approximate effects thereof, if practicable, and the reasons why compliance with the principle would result in a misleading statement.

 

Rule 204-Other Technical Standards

 

A member shall comply with other technical standards promulgated by bodies designated by Council to establish such standards, and departures therefrom must be justified by those who do not follow them.

 

Rule 301-Confidential Client Information

 

A member shall not disclose any confidential information obtained in the course of a professional engagement except with the consent of the client.

 

This rule shall not be construed (a) to relieve a member of his obligation under rules 202 and 203, (b) to affect in any way his compliance with a validly issued subpoena or summons enforceable by order of a court, (c) to prohibit review of a member's professional practices as a part of voluntary quality review under Institute authorization, or (d) to preclude a member from responding to any inquiry made by the ethics division or trial board of the Institute, by a duly constituted investigative or disciplinary body of a state CPA society, or under state statutes.

 

Members of the ethics division and trial board of the Institute and professional practice reviewers under Institute authorization shall not disclose any confidential client information which comes to their attention from members in disciplinary proceedings or otherwise in carrying out their official responsibilities. However, this prohibition shall not restrict the exchange of information with an aforementioned duly constituted investigative or disciplinary body.

 

Rule 302-Contingent Fees

 

Professional services shall not be offered or rendered under an arrangement whereby no fee will be charged unless a specified finding or result is attained, or where the fee is otherwise contingent upon the findings or results of such services. However, a member's fees may vary depending, for example, on the complexity of the service rendered.

 

* See Appendix B, page 44.

 

Fees are not regarded as being contingent if fixed by courts or other public authorities or, in tax matters, if determined based on the results of judicial proceedings or the findings of governmental agencies.

 

Rule 401 -Encroachment

 

Repealed effective March 31, 1979.

 

Rule 501-Acts Discreditable

 

A member shall not commit an act discreditable to the profession.

 

Rule 502-Advertising and Other Forms of Solicitation

 

A member shall not seek to obtain clients by advertising or other forms of solicitation in a manner that is false, misleading, or deceptive. (As amended March 31, 1979.)

 

Rule 503-Commissions

 

A member shall not pay a commission to obtain a client, nor shall he accept a commission for a referral to a client of products or services of others. This rule shall not prohibit payments for the purchase of an accounting practice or retirement payments to individuals formerly engaged in the practice of public accounting or payments to their heirs or estates.

 

Rule 504-Incompatible Occupations

 

A member who is engaged in the practice of public accounting shall not concurrently engage in any business or occupation which would create a conflict of interest in rendering professional services. Rule 505-Form of Practice and Name A member may practice public accounting, whether as an owner or employee, only in the form of a proprietorship, a partnership, or a professional corporation whose characteristics conform to resolutions of Council. (See Appendix C, page 45.)

 

A member shall not practice under a firm name which includes any fictitious name, indicates specialization, or is misleading as to the type of organization (proprietorship, partnership, or corporation). However, names of one or more past partners or shareholders may be included in the firm name of a successor partnership or corporation. Also, a partner surviving the death or withdrawal of all other partners may continue to practice under the partnership name for up to two years after becoming a sole practitioner.

 

*A firm may not designate itself as "Members of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants" unless all of its partners or shareholders are members of the Institute.

Code of Ethics (2011)

Organization: American College of Healthcare Executives Visit Organization Page
Source: ACHE Code of Ethics Visit Source Page
Date Approved: 
November 14, 2011

Disclaimer: Please note the codes in our collection might not necessarily be the most recent versions. Please contact the individual organizations or their websites to verify if a more recent or updated code of ethics is available. CSEP does not hold copyright on any of the codes of ethics in our collection. Any permission to use the codes must be sought from the individual organizations directly.

American College of Healthcare Executives Code of Ethics

PREAMBLE

The purpose of the Code of Ethics of the American College of Healthcare Executives is to serve as a standard of conduct for affiliates. It contains standards of ethical behavior for healthcare executives in their professional relationships. These relationships include colleagues, patients or others served; members of the healthcare executive’s organization and other organizations; the community; and society as a whole.

 

The Code of Ethics also incorporates standards of ethical behavior governing individual behavior, particularly when that conduct directly relates to the role and identity of the healthcare executive.

 

The fundamental objectives of the healthcare management profession are to maintain or enhance the overall quality of life, dignity and well-being of every individual needing healthcare service and to create a more equitable, accessible, effective and efficient healthcare system.

 

Healthcare executives have an obligation to act in ways that will merit the trust, confidence, and respect of healthcare professionals and the general public. Therefore, healthcare executives should lead lives that embody an exemplary system of values and ethics.

 

In fulfilling their commitments and obligations to patients or others served, healthcare executives function as moral advocates and models. Since every management decision affects the health and well-being of both individuals and communities, healthcare executives must carefully evaluate the possible outcomes of their decisions. In organizations that deliver healthcare services, they must work to safeguard and foster the rights, interests and prerogatives of patients or others served.

 

The role of moral advocate requires that healthcare executives take actions necessary to promote such rights, interests and prerogatives.

 

Being a model means that decisions and actions will reflect personal integrity and ethical leadership that others will seek to emulate.

 

I. THE HEALTHCARE EXECUTIVE'S RESPONSIBILITIES TO THE PROFESSION OF HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT

 

The healthcare executive shall:

 

A. Uphold the Code of Ethics and mission of the American College of Healthcare Executives;

 

B. Conduct professional activities with honesty, integrity, respect, fairness and good faith in a manner that will reflect well upon the profession;

 

C. Comply with all laws and regulations pertaining to healthcare management in the jurisdictions in which the healthcare executive is located or conducts professional activities;

 

D. Maintain competence and proficiency in healthcare management by implementing a personal program of assessment and continuing professional education;

 

E. Avoid the improper exploitation of professional relationships for personal gain;

 

F, Disclose financial and other conflicts of interest;

 

G. Use this Code to further the interests of the profession and not for selfish reasons;

 

H. Respect professional confidences;

 

I. Enhance the dignity and image of the healthcare management profession through positive public information programs; and

 

J. Refrain from participating in any activity that demeans the credibility and dignity of the healthcare management profession.

 

II. THE HEALTHCARE EXECUTIVE'S RESPONSIBILITIES TO PATIENTS OR OTHERS SERVED

 

The healthcare executive shall, within the scope of his or her authority:

 

A. Work to ensure the existence of a process to evaluate the quality of care or service rendered;

 

B. Avoid practicing or facilitating discrimination and institute safeguards to prevent discriminatory organizational practices;

 

C. Work to ensure the existence of a process that will advise patients or others served of the rights, opportunities, responsibilities and risks regarding available healthcare services;

 

D. Work to ensure that there is a process in place to facilitate the resolution of conflicts that may arise when values of patients and their families differ from those of employees and physicians;

 

E. Demonstrate zero tolerance for any abuse of power that compromises patients or others served;

 

F. Work to provide a process that ensures the autonomy and self-determination of patients or others served;

 

G. Work to ensure the existence of procedures that will safeguard the confidentiality and privacy of patients or others served; and

 

H. Work to ensure the existence of an ongoing process and procedures to review, develop and consistently implement evidence-based clinical practices throughout the organization.

 

III. THE HEALTHCARE EXECUTIVE'S RESPONSIBILITIES TO THE ORGANIZATION

 

The healthcare executive shall, within the scope of his or her authority:

 

A. Provide healthcare services consistent with available resources, and when there are limited resources, work to ensure the existence of a resource allocation process that considers ethical ramifications;

 

B. Conduct both competitive and cooperative activities in ways that improve community healthcare services;

 

C. Lead the organization in the use and improvement of standards of management and sound business practices;

 

D. Respect the customs and practices of patients or others served, consistent with the organization’s philosophy;

 

E. Be truthful in all forms of professional and organizational communication, and avoid disseminating information that is false, misleading or deceptive;

 

F. Report negative financial and other information promptly and accurately, and initiate appropriate action; Prevent fraud and abuse and aggressive accounting practices that may result in disputable financial reports;

 

G. Create an organizational environment in which both clinical and management mistakes are minimized and, when they do occur, are disclosed and addressed effectively;

 

H. Implement an organizational code of ethics and monitor compliance; and

 

I. Provide ethics resources and mechanisms for staff to address ethical organizational and clinical issues.

 

IV. THE HEALTHCARE EXECUTIVE'S RESPONSIBILITIES TO EMPLOYEES

 

Healthcare executives have ethical and professional obligations to the employees they manage that encompass but are not limited to:

 

A. Creating a work environment that promotes ethical conduct;

 

B. Providing a work environment that encourages a free expression of ethical concerns and provides mechanisms for discussing and addressing such concerns;

 

C. Promoting a healthy work environment which includes freedom from harassment, sexual and other, and coercion of any kind, especially to perform illegal or unethical acts;

 

D. Promoting a culture of inclusivity that seeks to prevent discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age or disability;

 

E. Providing a work environment that promotes the proper use of employees’ knowledge and skills; and

 

F. Providing a safe and healthy work environment.

 

V. THE HEALTHCARE EXECUTIVE'S RESPONSIBILITIES TO COMMUNITY AND SOCIETY

 

The healthcare executive shall:

A. Work to identify and meet the healthcare needs of the community;

 

B. Work to support access to healthcare services for all people;

C. Encourage and participate in public dialogue on healthcare policy issues, and advocate solutions that will improve health status and promote quality healthcare;

 

D. Apply short- and long-term assessments to management decisions affecting both community and society; and

 

E. Provide prospective patients and others with adequate and accurate information, enabling them to make enlightened decisions regarding services.

 

VI. THE HEALTHCARE EXECUTIVE'S RESPONSIBILITY TO REPORT VIOLATIONS OF THE CODE

 

An affiliate of ACHE who has reasonable grounds to believe that another affiliate has violated this Code has a duty to communicate such facts to the Ethics Committee.

 

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

 

1. ACHE Ethical Policy Statements

 

"Considerations for Healthcare Executive-Supplier Interactions"

 

"Creating an Ethical Culture Within the Healthcare Organization"

 

"Decisions Near the End of Life" "Ethical Decision Making for Healthcare Executives"

 

"Ethical Issues Related to a Reduction in Force"

 

"Ethical Issues Related to Staff Shortages" "Health Information Confidentiality"

 

"Impaired Healthcare Executives" "Promise Making, Keeping and Rescinding"

 

2. ACHE Grievance Procedure

 

3. ACHE Ethics Committee Action

 

3. ACHE Ethics Committee Scope and Function

Code of Ethics (2001)

Organization: American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Visit Organization Page
Source: Code of Ethics Visit Source Page
Date Approved: 
July 1, 2001

Disclaimer: Please note the codes in our collection might not necessarily be the most recent versions. Please contact the individual organizations or their websites to verify if a more recent or updated code of ethics is available. CSEP does not hold copyright on any of the codes of ethics in our collection. Any permission to use the codes must be sought from the individual organizations directly.

Code of Ethics

Effective July 1, 2001

 

Preamble

 

The Board of Directors of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) hereby promulgates, pursuant to Article 2, Section 2.013 of the Association's Bylaws, the Revised AAMFT Code of Ethics, effective July 1, 2001.

 

The AAMFT strives to honor the public trust in marriage and family therapists by setting standards for ethical practice as described in this Code. The ethical standards define professional expectations and are enforced by the AAMFT Ethics Committee. The absence of an explicit reference to a specific behavior or situation in the Code does not mean that the behavior is ethical or unethical. The standards are not exhaustive. Marriage and family therapists who are uncertain about the ethics of a particular course of action are encouraged to seek counsel from consultants, attorneys, supervisors, colleagues, or other appropriate authorities.

 

Both law and ethics govern the practice of marriage and family therapy. When making decisions regarding professional behavior, marriage and family therapists must consider the AAMFT Code of Ethics and applicable laws and regulations. If the AAMFT Code of Ethics prescribes a standard higher than that required by law, marriage and family therapists must meet the higher standard of the AAMFT Code of Ethics. Marriage and family therapists comply with the mandates of law, but make known their commitment to the AAMFT Code of Ethics and take steps to resolve the conflict in a responsible manner. The AAMFT supports legal mandates for reporting of alleged unethical conduct.

 

The AAMFT Code of Ethics is binding on Members of AAMFT in all membership categories, AAMFT-Approved Supervisors, and applicants for membership and the Approved Supervisor designation (hereafter, AAMFT Member). AAMFT members have an obligation to be familiar with the AAMFT Code of Ethics and its application to their professional services. Lack of awareness or misunderstanding of an ethical standard is not a defense to a charge of unethical conduct.

 

The process for filing, investigating, and resolving complaints of unethical conduct is described in the current Procedures for Handling Ethical Matters of the AAMFT Ethics Committee. Persons accused are considered innocent by the Ethics Committee until proven guilty, except as otherwise provided, and are entitled to due process. If an AAMFT Member resigns in anticipation of, or during the course of, an ethics investigation, the Ethics Committee will complete its investigation. Any publication of action taken by the Association will include the fact that the Member attempted to resign during the investigation.

 

Principle I

Responsibility to Clients

 

Marriage and family therapists advance the welfare of families and individuals. They respect the rights of those persons seeking their assistance, and make reasonable efforts to ensure that their services are used appropriately.

 

1.1. Marriage and family therapists provide professional assistance to persons without discrimination on the basis of race, age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, disability, gender, health status, religion, national origin, or sexual orientation.

 

1.2 Marriage and family therapists obtain appropriate informed consent to therapy or related procedures as early as feasible in the therapeutic relationship, and use language that is reasonably understandable to clients. The content of informed consent may vary depending upon the client and treatment plan; however, informed consent generally necessitates that the client: (a) has the capacity to consent; (b) has been adequately informed of significant information concerning treatment processes and procedures; (c) has been adequately informed of potential risks and benefits of treatments for which generally recognized standards do not yet exist; (d) has freely and without undue influence expressed consent; and (e) has provided consent that is appropriately documented. When persons, due to age or mental status, are legally incapable of giving informed consent, marriage and family therapists obtain informed permission from a legally authorized person, if such substitute consent is legally permissible.

 

1.3 Marriage and family therapists are aware of their influential positions with respect to clients, and they avoid exploiting the trust and dependency of such persons. Therapists, therefore, make every effort to avoid conditions and multiple relationships with clients that could impair professional judgment or increase the risk of exploitation. Such relationships include, but are not limited to, business or close personal relationships with a client or the client’s immediate family. When the risk of impairment or exploitation exists due to conditions or multiple roles, therapists take appropriate precautions.

 

1.4 Sexual intimacy with clients is prohibited.

 

1.5 Sexual intimacy with former clients is likely to be harmful and is therefore prohibited for two years following the termination of therapy or last professional contact. In an effort to avoid exploiting the trust and dependency of clients, marriage and family therapists should not engage in sexual intimacy with former clients after the two years following termination or last professional contact. Should therapists engage in sexual intimacy with former clients following two years after termination or last professional contact, the burden shifts to the therapist to demonstrate that there has been no exploitation or injury to the former client or to the client’s immediate family.

 

1.6 Marriage and family therapists comply with applicable laws regarding the reporting of alleged unethical conduct.

 

1.7 Marriage and family therapists do not use their professional relationships with clients to further their own interests.

 

1.8 Marriage and family therapists respect the rights of clients to make decisions and help them to understand the consequences of these decisions. Therapists clearly advise the clients that they have the responsibility to make decisions regarding relationships such as cohabitation, marriage, divorce, separation, reconciliation, custody, and visitation.

 

1.9 Marriage and family therapists continue therapeutic relationships only so long as it is reasonably clear that clients are benefiting from the relationship.

 

1.10 Marriage and family therapists assist persons in obtaining other therapeutic services if the therapist is unable or unwilling, for appropriate reasons, to provide professional help.

 

1.11 Marriage and family therapists do not abandon or neglect clients in treatment without making reasonable arrangements for the continuation of such treatment.

 

1.12 Marriage and family therapists obtain written informed consent from clients before videotaping, audio recording, or permitting third-party observation.

 

1.13 Marriage and family therapists, upon agreeing to provide services to a person or entity at the request of a third party, clarify, to the extent feasible and at the outset of the service, the nature of the relationship with each party and the limits of confidentiality.

 

Principle II

Confidentiality

 

Marriage and family therapists have unique confidentiality concerns because the client in a therapeutic relationship may be more than one person. Therapists respect and guard the confidences of each individual client.

 

2.1 Marriage and family therapists disclose to clients and other interested parties, as early as feasible in their professional contacts, the nature of confidentiality and possible limitations of the clients’ right to confidentiality. Therapists review with clients the circumstances where confidential information may be requested and where disclosure of confidential information may be legally required. Circumstances may necessitate repeated disclosures.

 

2.2 Marriage and family therapists do not disclose client confidences except by written authorization or waiver, or where mandated or permitted by law. Verbal authorization will not be sufficient except in emergency situations, unless prohibited by law. When providing couple, family or group treatment, the therapist does not disclose information outside the treatment context without a written authorization from each individual competent to execute a waiver. In the context of couple, family or group treatment, the therapist may not reveal any individual’s confidences to others in the client unit without the prior written permission of that individual.

 

2.3 Marriage and family therapists use client and/or clinical materials in teaching, writing, consulting, research, and public presentations only if a written waiver has been obtained in accordance with Subprinciple 2.2, or when appropriate steps have been taken to protect client identity and confidentiality. 2.4 Marriage and family therapists store, safeguard, and dispose of client records in ways that maintain confidentiality and in accord with applicable laws and professional standards.

 

2.5 Subsequent to the therapist moving from the area, closing the practice, or upon the death of the therapist, a marriage and family therapist arranges for the storage, transfer, or disposal of client records in ways that maintain confidentiality and safeguard the welfare of clients.

 

2.6 Marriage and family therapists, when consulting with colleagues or referral sources, do not share confidential information that could reasonably lead to the identification of a client, research participant, supervisee, or other person with whom they have a confidential relationship unless they have obtained the prior written consent of the client, research participant, supervisee, or other person with whom they have a confidential relationship. Information may be shared only to the extent necessary to achieve the purposes of the consultation.

 

Principle III

Professional Competence and Integrity

 

Marriage and family therapists maintain high standards of professional competence and integrity.

 

3.1 Marriage and family therapists pursue knowledge of new developments and maintain competence in marriage and family therapy through education, training, or supervised experience.

 

3.2 Marriage and family therapists maintain adequate knowledge of and adhere to applicable laws, ethics, and professional standards.

 

3.3 Marriage and family therapists seek appropriate professional assistance for their personal problems or conflicts that may impair work performance or clinical judgment.

 

3.4 Marriage and family therapists do not provide services that create a conflict of interest that may impair work performance or clinical judgment.

 

3.5 Marriage and family therapists, as presenters, teachers, supervisors, consultants and researchers, are dedicated to high standards of scholarship, present accurate information, and disclose potential conflicts of interest.

 

3.6 Marriage and family therapists maintain accurate and adequate clinical and financial records.

 

3.7 While developing new skills in specialty areas, marriage and family therapists take steps to ensure the competence of their work and to protect clients from possible harm. Marriage and family therapists practice in specialty areas new to them only after appropriate education, training, or supervised experience.

 

3.8 Marriage and family therapists do not engage in sexual or other forms of harassment of clients, students, trainees, supervisees, employees, colleagues, or research subjects.

 

3.9 Marriage and family therapists do not engage in the exploitation of clients, students, trainees, supervisees, employees, colleagues, or research subjects.

 

3.10 Marriage and family therapists do not give to or receive from clients (a) gifts of substantial value or (b) gifts that impair the integrity or efficacy of the therapeutic relationship.

 

3.11 Marriage and family therapists do not diagnose, treat, or advise on problems outside the recognized boundaries of their competencies.

 

3.12 Marriage and family therapists make efforts to prevent the distortion or misuse of their clinical and research findings.

 

3.13 Marriage and family therapists, because of their ability to influence and alter the lives of others, exercise special care when making public their professional recommendations and opinions through testimony or other public statements.

 

3.14 To avoid a conflict of interests, marriage and family therapists who treat minors or adults involved in custody or visitation actions may not also perform forensic evaluations for custody, residence, or visitation of the minor. The marriage and family therapist who treats the minor may provide the court or mental health professional performing the evaluation with information about the minor from the marriage and family therapist’s perspective as a treating marriage and family therapist, so long as the marriage and family therapist does not violate confidentiality.

 

3.15 Marriage and family therapists are in violation of this Code and subject to termination of membership or other appropriate action if they: (a) are convicted of any felony; (b) are convicted of a misdemeanor related to their qualifications or functions; (c) engage in conduct which could lead to conviction of a felony, or a misdemeanor related to their qualifications or functions; (d) are expelled from or disciplined by other professional organizations; (e) have their licenses or certificates suspended or revoked or are otherwise disciplined by regulatory bodies; (f) continue to practice marriage and family therapy while no longer competent to do so because they are impaired by physical or mental causes or the abuse of alcohol or other substances; or (g) fail to cooperate with the Association at any point from the inception of an ethical complaint through the completion of all proceedings regarding that complaint.

 

Principle IV

Responsibility to Students and Supervisees

 

Marriage and family therapists do not exploit the trust and dependency of students and supervisees.

 

4.1 Marriage and family therapists are aware of their influential positions with respect to students and supervisees, and they avoid exploiting the trust and dependency of such persons. Therapists, therefore, make every effort to avoid conditions and multiple relationships that could impair professional objectivity or increase the risk of exploitation. When the risk of impairment or exploitation exists due to conditions or multiple roles, therapists take appropriate precautions.

 

4.2 Marriage and family therapists do not provide therapy to current students or supervisees.

 

4.3 Marriage and family therapists do not engage in sexual intimacy with students or supervisees during the evaluative or training relationship between the therapist and student or supervisee. Should a supervisor engage in sexual activity with a former supervisee, the burden of proof shifts to the supervisor to demonstrate that there has been no exploitation or injury to the supervisee.

 

4.4 Marriage and family therapists do not permit students or supervisees to perform or to hold themselves out as competent to perform professional services beyond their training, level of experience, and competence.

 

4.5 Marriage and family therapists take reasonable measures to ensure that services provided by supervisees are professional.

 

4.6 Marriage and family therapists avoid accepting as supervisees or students those individuals with whom a prior or existing relationship could compromise the therapist’s objectivity. When such situations cannot be avoided, therapists take appropriate precautions to maintain objectivity. Examples of such relationships include, but are not limited to, those individuals with whom the therapist has a current or prior sexual, close personal, immediate familial, or therapeutic relationship.

 

4.7 Marriage and family therapists do not disclose supervisee confidences except by written authorization or waiver, or when mandated or permitted by law. In educational or training settings where there are multiple supervisors, disclosures are permitted only to other professional colleagues, administrators, or employers who share responsibility for training of the supervisee. Verbal authorization will not be sufficient except in emergency situations, unless prohibited by law.

 

Principle V

Responsibility to Research Participants

 

Investigators respect the dignity and protect the welfare of research participants, and are aware of applicable laws and regulations and professional standards governing the conduct of research.

 

5. 1 Investigators are responsible for making careful examinations of ethical acceptability in planning studies. To the extent that services to research participants may be compromised by participation in research, investigators seek the ethical advice of qualified professionals not directly involved in the investigation and observe safeguards to protect the rights of research participants.

 

5. 2 Investigators requesting participant involvement in research inform participants of the aspects of the research that might reasonably be expected to influence willingness to participate. Investigators are especially sensitive to the possibility of diminished consent when participants are also receiving clinical services, or have impairments which limit understanding and/or communication, or when participants are children.

 

5.3 Investigators respect each participant’s freedom to decline participation in or to withdraw from a research study at any time. This obligation requires special thought and consideration when investigators or other members of the research team are in positions of authority or influence over participants. Marriage and family therapists, therefore, make every effort to avoid multiple relationships with research participants that could impair professional judgment or increase the risk of exploitation.

 

5.4 Information obtained about a research participant during the course of an investigation is confidential unless there is a waiver previously obtained in writing. When the possibility exists that others, including family members, may obtain access to such information, this possibility, together with the plan for protecting confidentiality, is explained as part of the procedure for obtaining informed consent.

 

Principle VI

Responsibility to the Profession

 

Marriage and family therapists respect the rights and responsibilities of professional colleagues and participate in activities that advance the goals of the profession.

 

6.1 Marriage and family therapists remain accountable to the standards of the profession when acting as members or employees of organizations. If the mandates of an organization with which a marriage and family therapist is affiliated, through employment, contract or otherwise, conflict with the AAMFT Code of Ethics, marriage and family therapists make known to the organization their commitment to the AAMFT Code of Ethics and attempt to resolve the conflict in a way that allows the fullest adherence to the Code of Ethics.

 

6.2 Marriage and family therapists assign publication credit to those who have contributed to a publication in proportion to their contributions and in accordance with customary professional publication practices.

 

6.3 Marriage and family therapists do not accept or require authorship credit for a publication based on research from a student’s program, unless the therapist made a substantial contribution beyond being a faculty advisor or research committee member. Coauthorship on a student thesis, dissertation, or project should be determined in accordance with principles of fairness and justice.

 

6.4 Marriage and family therapists who are the authors of books or other materials that are published or distributed do not plagiarize or fail to cite persons to whom credit for original ideas or work is due.

 

6.5 Marriage and family therapists who are the authors of books or other materials published or distributed by an organization take reasonable precautions to ensure that the organization promotes and advertises the materials accurately and factually.

 

6.6 Marriage and family therapists participate in activities that contribute to a better community and society, including devoting a portion of their professional activity to services for which there is little or no financial return.

 

6.7 Marriage and family therapists are concerned with developing laws and regulations pertaining to marriage and family therapy that serve the public interest, and with altering such laws and regulations that are not in the public interest. 6.8 Marriage and family therapists encourage public participation in the design and delivery of professional services and in the regulation of practitioners.

 

Principle VII

Financial Arrangements

 

Marriage and family therapists make financial arrangements with clients, third-party payors, and supervisees that are reasonably understandable and conform to accepted professional practices.

 

7.1 Marriage and family therapists do not offer or accept kickbacks, rebates, bonuses, or other remuneration for referrals; fee-for-service arrangements are not prohibited.

 

7.2 Prior to entering into the therapeutic or supervisory relationship, marriage and family therapists clearly disclose and explain to clients and supervisees: (a) all financial arrangements and fees related to professional services, including charges for canceled or missed appointments; (b) the use of collection agencies or legal measures for nonpayment; and (c) the procedure for obtaining payment from the client, to the extent allowed by law, if payment is denied by the third-party payor. Once services have begun, therapists provide reasonable notice of any changes in fees or other charges.

 

7.3 Marriage and family therapists give reasonable notice to clients with unpaid balances of their intent to seek collection by agency or legal recourse. When such action is taken, therapists will not disclose clinical information.

 

7.4 Marriage and family therapists represent facts truthfully to clients, third-party payors, and supervisees regarding services rendered.

 

7.5 Marriage and family therapists ordinarily refrain from accepting goods and services from clients in return for services rendered. Bartering for professional services may be conducted only if: (a) the supervisee or client requests it, (b) the relationship is not exploitative, (c) the professional relationship is not distorted, and (d) a clear written contract is established.

 

7.6 Marriage and family therapists may not withhold records under their immediate control that are requested and needed for a client’s treatment solely because payment has not been received for past services, except as otherwise provided by law.

 

Principle VIII

Advertising

 

Marriage and family therapists engage in appropriate informational activities, including those that enable the public, referral sources, or others to choose professional services on an informed basis.

 

8.1 Marriage and family therapists accurately represent their competencies, education, training, and experience relevant to their practice of marriage and family therapy.

 

8.2 Marriage and family therapists ensure that advertisements and publications in any media (such as directories, announcements, business cards, newspapers, radio, television, Internet, and facsimiles) convey information that is necessary for the public to make an appropriate selection of professional services. Information could include: (a) office information, such as name, address, telephone number, credit card acceptability, fees, languages spoken, and office hours; (b) qualifying clinical degree (see subprinciple 8.5); (c) other earned degrees (see subprinciple 8.5) and state or provincial licensures and/or certifications; (d) AAMFT clinical member status; and (e) description of practice.

 

8.3 Marriage and family therapists do not use names that could mislead the public concerning the identity, responsibility, source, and status of those practicing under that name, and do not hold themselves out as being partners or associates of a firm if they are not.

 

8.4 Marriage and family therapists do not use any professional identification (such as a business card, office sign, letterhead, Internet, or telephone or association directory listing) if it includes a statement or claim that is false, fraudulent, misleading, or deceptive.

 

8.5 In representing their educational qualifications, marriage and family therapists list and claim as evidence only those earned degrees: (a) from institutions accredited by regional accreditation sources recognized by the United States Department of Education, (b) from institutions recognized by states or provinces that license or certify marriage and family therapists, or (c) from equivalent foreign institutions.

 

8.6 Marriage and family therapists correct, wherever possible, false, misleading, or inaccurate information and representations made by others concerning the therapist's qualifications, services, or products.

 

8.7 Marriage and family therapists make certain that the qualifications of their employees or supervisees are represented in a manner that is not false, misleading, or deceptive.

 

8.8 Marriage and family therapists do not represent themselves as providing specialized services unless they have the appropriate education, training, or supervised experience.

 

This Code is published by:

American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy

112 South Alfred Street, Alexandria, VA 22314

Phone: (703) 838-9808 - Fax: (703) 838-9805

 

www.aamft.org

 

© Copyright 2001 by the AAMFT. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (2006)

Organization: International Federation of Accountants Visit Organization Page
Source: Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants Visit Source Page
Date Approved: 
July 2006

Disclaimer: Please note the codes in our collection might not necessarily be the most recent versions. Please contact the individual organizations or their websites to verify if a more recent or updated code of ethics is available. CSEP does not hold copyright on any of the codes of ethics in our collection. Any permission to use the codes must be sought from the individual organizations directly.

Due to the length of this document please download the PDF version of the Code.

Handbook of the Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (2010)

Organization: International Federation of Accountants Visit Organization Page
Source: Handbook of the Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants Visit Source Page
Date Approved: 
2010

Disclaimer: Please note the codes in our collection might not necessarily be the most recent versions. Please contact the individual organizations or their websites to verify if a more recent or updated code of ethics is available. CSEP does not hold copyright on any of the codes of ethics in our collection. Any permission to use the codes must be sought from the individual organizations directly.

2010 Handbook of the Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants

Because of the legnth of this document, please download the PDF of the handbook.

Code of Conduct for BCS Members (2011)

Organization: British Computer Society Visit Organization Page
Source: Code of Conduct for BCS Members Visit Source Page
Date Approved: 
June 2011

Disclaimer: Please note the codes in our collection might not necessarily be the most recent versions. Please contact the individual organizations or their websites to verify if a more recent or updated code of ethics is available. CSEP does not hold copyright on any of the codes of ethics in our collection. Any permission to use the codes must be sought from the individual organizations directly.

Code of Conduct for BCS Members

Introduction

 

As a professional body the British Computer Society (known as BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT), has a responsibility to set rules and professional standards to direct the behaviour of its members in professional matters. It is expected that these rules and professional standards will be higher than those established by the general law and that they will be enforced through disciplinary action which can result in expulsion from membership.

 

Members are expected to exercise their own judgement (which should be made in such a way as to be reasonably justified) to meet the requirements of the code and seek advice if in doubt.

 

Appendix 1 to the code sets examples of interpretation of the tenets of professional conduct and form part of this Code of Conduct.

 

Breaches of the Code of Conduct

 

 

If a member of BCS should know of, or become aware of, any breach of this Code of Conduct by another member they are under an obligation to notify BCS.

 

Breaches of the Code of Conduct may also be brought to the attention of BCS by others who are not members of BCS.

 

Any breach of the Code of Conduct brought to the attention of BCS, or of which BCS becomes aware, will be considered under the Institute’s Disciplinary procedures.

 

Where BCS receives information that a member has been convicted of a criminal offence, the member, when asked will provide a Standard Disclosure Certificate or other similar notice providing evidence of their criminal record (if any) within 28 days. Note that not all convictions are seen as relevant to membership in BCS and each case will be considered individually.

 

Correspondence in connection with this Code of Conduct should be directed to:

 

Customer Service team

BCS,The Chartered Institute for IT,

First Floor, Block D,

North Star House,

North Star Avenue,

Swindon SN2 1FA

 

Email: customerservice@hq.bcs.org.uk

 

  BCS CODE OF CONDUCT

 

This Code of Conduct:

  •  sets out the professional standards required by BCS as a condition of membership.
  •  applies to all members, irrespective of their membership grade, the role they fulfil, or the jurisdiction where they are employed or discharge their contractual obligations. 
  • governs the conduct of the individual, not the nature of the business or ethics of any Relevant Authority * . 

1. Public Interest

 

You shall:

  •  have due regard for public health, privacy, security and wellbeing of others and the environment. 
  •  have due regard for the legitimate rights of Third Parties * . 
  •  conduct your professional activities without discrimination on the grounds of sex, sexual orientation, marital status, nationality, colour, race, ethnic origin, religion, age or disability, or of any other condition or requirement 
  •  promote equal access to the benefits of IT and seek to promote the inclusion of all sectors in society wherever opportunities arise. 

 

2. Professional Competence and Integrity

 

You shall:

  1.  only undertake to do work or provide a service that is within your professional competence. 
  2.  NOT claim any level of competence that you do not possess. 
  3.  develop your professional knowledge, skills and competence on a continuing basis, maintaining awareness of technological developments, procedures, and standards that are relevant to your field. 
  4.  ensure that you have the knowledge and understanding of Legislation * and that you comply with such Legislation, in carrying out your professional responsibilities. 
  5.  respect and value alternative viewpoints and, seek, accept and offer honest criticisms of work. f. avoid injuring others, their property, reputation, or employment by false or malicious or negligent action or inaction. g. reject and will not make any offer of bribery or unethical inducement.

 

3. Duty to Relevant Authority

 

You shall:

 

  1.  carry out your professional responsibilities with due care and diligence in accordance with the Relevant Authority’s requirements whilst exercising your professional judgement at all times. 
  2.  seek to avoid any situation that may give rise to a conflict of interest between you and your Relevant Authority. 
  3.  accept professional responsibility for your work and for the work of colleagues who are defined in a given context as working under your supervision. 
  4. NOT disclose or authorise to be disclosed, or use for personal gain or to benefit a third party, confidential information except with the permission of your Relevant Authority, or as required by Legislation. 

 NOT misrepresent or withhold information on the performance of products, systems or services (unless lawfully bound by a duty of confidentiality not to disclose such information), or take advantage of the lack of relevant knowledge or inexperience of others. 

 

4. Duty to the Profession

 

You shall:

 

  1.  accept your personal duty to uphold the reputation of the profession and not take any action which could bring the profession into disrepute. 
  2.  seek to improve professional standards through participation in their development, use and enforcement. 
  3.  uphold the reputation and good standing of BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT. 
  4.  act with integrity and respect in your professional relationships with all members of BCS and with members of other professions with whom you work in a professional capacity. 
  5.  notify BCS if convicted of a criminal offence or upon becoming bankrupt or disqualified as a Company Director and in each case give details of the relevant jurisdiction. 
  6.  encourage and support fellow members in their professional development. 

 APPENDIX 1

Interpretation of the BCS Code of Conduct

 

The explanatory notes below are offered for guidance only. The examples are not, and not intended to be, exhaustive.

 

If you are in a leadership position and especially if you hold an executive position you are expected to:

  •  encourage and facilitate colleagues to develop as professionals. 
  •  seek to ensure that no one is penalised for raising areas of concern or conflicts of interest. 
  •  encourage colleagues to follow this code of conduct.

 

Definitions:

 

Legislation

The term “Legislation” means any applicable laws, statutes and regulations.

 

Third Parties

The term “Third Parties” includes any person or organisation that might be affected by your activities in your professional capacity, irrespective of whether they are directly aware or involved in those activities.

 

Relevant Authority

The term “Relevant Authority” in this document is used to identify the person(s) or organisation(s) which has/have authority over the activity of individuals in their professional capacity. For practising BCS members this is normally an employer or client. For student members, this is normally an academic institution.

 

Public Interest

  •  Acting in the public interest may be governed by Legislation. 
  •  Legitimate rights of third parties include protecting personal identifiable data to prevent unlawful disclosure and identity theft, and also respect for copyright, patents and other intellectual property. 

 

Professional Competence and Integrity

  •  All members are required to undertake professional development activities as a condition of membership. Continuing professional development activities should broaden your knowledge of the IT profession and maintain your competence in your area of specialism.  You should seek out and observe good practice exemplified by rules, standards, conventions or protocols that are relevant in your area of specialism
  •  You should only claim current competence where you can demonstrate you have the required expertise e.g. through recognised competencies, qualifications or experience. 
  •  Legislation that may apply in carrying out your professional responsibilities might include that applicable to: 
    •  your Relevant Authority. 
    •  the geographic area in which you are carrying out your professional responsibilities. 
    • the geographic area in which your responsibilities will be discharged.   You may need to seek guidance from your Relevant Authority.
  •  Where you are leading a first of kind project you will ensure that you make use of peer review and support where appropriate.

 

Duty to Relevant Authority

  •  Exercising of your professional judgement:
    •  Where there is conflict between full and committed compliance with the Relevant Authority’s instructions and the independent and considered exercise of your professional judgement, you will indicate the likely risks and consequences.
    •  If any conflict is likely to occur or be seen by a third party as likely to occur you will make full and immediate disclosure to your Relevant Authority. 
    •  If for any reason you are unable to complete any assigned tasks in accordance with their requirements (e.g. on time or within budget) you will advise the Relevant Authority as soon as practicable. 

 

Duty to the Profession

  • As a member of BCS you have a responsibility to: 
    •  share knowledge and understanding of IT and support inclusion of every sector of society. 
    •  encourage and support fellow members in their professional development. 
  •  In circumstances where a member is also a member of another professional body the clauses of any other applicable code of conduct cannot be employed to diminish or negate the clauses of the BCS Code of Conduct. 
  •  You will not make any statement on behalf of BCS or purport to represent BCS through any public medium, including digital social media, unless authorised to do so by BCS.

Code of Ethics (2009)

Organization: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association) Visit Organization Page
Source: Code of Ethics Visit Source Page
Date Approved: 
May 2009

Disclaimer: Please note the codes in our collection might not necessarily be the most recent versions. Please contact the individual organizations or their websites to verify if a more recent or updated code of ethics is available. CSEP does not hold copyright on any of the codes of ethics in our collection. Any permission to use the codes must be sought from the individual organizations directly.

Code of Ethics

American Dietetic Association/Commission on Dietetic Registration Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics and Process for Consideration of Ethics Issues

 

PREAMBLE

The American Dietetic Association (ADA) and its credentialing agency, the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), believe it is in the best interest of the profession and the public it serves to have a Code of Ethics in place that provides guidance to dietetics practitioners in their professional practice and conduct. Dietetics practitioners have voluntarily adopted this Code of Ethics to reflect the values (Figure) and ethical principles guiding the dietetics profession and to set forth commitments and obligations of the dietetics practitioner to the public, clients, the profession, colleagues, and other professionals. The current Code of Ethics was approved on June 2, 2009, by the ADA Board of Directors, House of Delegates, and the Commission on Dietetic Registration.

 

APPLICATION

The Code of Ethics applies to the following practitioners:

(a) In its entirety to members of ADA who are Registered Dietitians (RDs) or Dietetic Technicians, Registered (DTRs);

(b) Except for sections dealing solely with the credential, to all members of ADA who are not RDs or DTRs; and

(c) Except for aspects dealing solely with membership, to all RDs and DTRs who are not members of ADA.

 

All individuals to whom the Code applies are referred to as “dietetics practitioners,” and all such individuals who are RDs and DTRs shall be known as “credentialed practitioners.” By accepting membership in ADA and/or accepting and maintaining CDR credentials, all members of ADA and credentialed dietetics practitioners agree to abide by the Code.

 

PRINCIPLES

Fundamental Principles

1.  The dietetics practitioner conducts himself/herself with honesty, integrity, and fairness. 


2.  The dietetics practitioner supports and promotes high standards of professional practice. The dietetics practitioner accepts the obligation to protect clients, the public, and the profession by upholding the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics and by reporting perceived violations of the Code through the processes established by ADA and its credentialing agency, CDR.

 

 Responsibilities to the Public

 3. The dietetics practitioner considers the health, safety, and welfare of the public at all times. The dietetics practitioner will report inappropriate behavior or treatment of a client by another dietetics practitioner or other professionals. 

 


4. The dietetics practitioner complies with all laws and regulations applicable or related to the profession or to the practitioner’s ethical obligations as described in this Code. 

a. The dietetics practitioner must not be convicted of a crime under the laws of the United States, whether a felony or a misdemeanor, an essential element of which is dishonesty.

b. The dietetics practitioner must not be disciplined by a state for conduct that would violate one or more of these principles. 

c. The dietetics practitioner must not commit an act of misfeasance or malfeasance that is directly related to the practice of the profession as determined by a court of competent jurisdiction, a licensing board, or an agency of a governmental body.


5. The dietetics practitioner provides professional services with objectivity and with respect for the unique needs and values of individuals.

a. The dietetics practitioner does not, in professional practice, discriminate against others on the basis of race, ethnicity, creed, religion, disability, gender, age, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, economic status, or any other legally protected category.

b. The dietetics practitioner provides services in a manner that is sensitive to cultural differences.

c. The dietetics practitioner does not engage in sexual harassment in connection with professional practice.


6. The dietetics practitioner does not engage in false or misleading practices or communications.

a. The dietetics practitioner does not engage in false or deceptive advertising of his or her services.

b. The dietetics practitioner promotes or endorses specific goods or products only in a manner that is not false and misleading.

c. The dietetics practitioner provides accurate and truthful information in communicating with the public.


7. The dietetics practitioner withdraws from professional practice when unable to fulfill his or her professional duties and responsibilities to clients and others.

a. The dietetics practitioner withdraws from practice when he/ she has engaged in abuse of a substance such that it could affect his or her practice.

b. The dietetics practitioner ceases practice when he or she has been adjudged by a court to be mentally incompetent.

c. The dietetics practitioner will not engage in practice when he or she has a condition that substantially impairs his or her ability to provide effective service to others.

 

Responsibilities to Clients

8. The dietetics practitioner recognizes and exercises professional judgment within the limits of his or her qualifications and collaborates with others, seeks counsel, or makes referrals as appropriate.

9. The dietetics practitioner treats clients and patients with respect and consideration.

a. The dietetics practitioner provides sufficient information to enable clients and others to make their own informed decisions.

b. The dietetics practitioner respects the client’s right to make decisions regarding the recommended plan of care, including consent, modification, or refusal.


10. The dietetics practitioner protects confidential information and makes full disclosure about any limitations on his or her ability to guarantee full confidentiality.


11. The dietetics practitioner, in dealing with and providing services to clients and others, complies with the same principles set forth above in “Responsibilities to the Public” (Principles #3-7). Responsibilities to the Profession


12. The dietetics practitioner practices dietetics based on evidence- based principles and current information.


13. The dietetics practitioner presents reliable and substantiated information and interprets controversial information without personal bias, recognizing that legitimate differences of opinion exist.


14. The dietetics practitioner assumes a life-long responsibility and accountability for personal competence in practice, consistent with accepted professional standards, continually striving to increase professional knowledge and skills and to apply them in practice.


15. The dietetics practitioner is alert to the occurrence of a real or potential conflict of interest and takes appropriate action whenever a conflict arises.

a. The dietetics practitioner makes full disclosure of any real or perceived conflict of interest.

b. When a conflict of interest cannot be resolved by disclosure, the dietetics practitioner takes such other action as may be necessary to eliminate the conflict, including recusal from an office, position, or practice situation.

 

16. The dietetics practitioner permits the use of his or her name for the purpose of certifying that dietetics services have been rendered only if he or she has provided or supervised the provision of those services.


17. The dietetics practitioner accurately presents professional qualifications and credentials.

a. The dietetics practitioner, in seeking, maintaining, and using credentials provided by CDR, provides accurate information and complies with all requirements imposed by CDR. The dietetics practitioner uses CDR-awarded credentials (“RD” or “Registered Dietitian”; “DTR” or “Dietetic Technician, Registered”; “CS” or “Certified Specialist”; and “FADA” or “Fellow of the American Dietetic Association”) only when the credential is current and authorized by CDR.

b. The dietetics practitioner does not aid any other person in violating any CDR requirements, or in representing himself or herself as CDR-credentialed when he or she is not.

 

18. The dietetics practitioner does not invite, accept, or offer gifts, monetary incentives, or other considerations that affect or reasonably give an appearance of affecting his/her professional judgment.

Clarification of Principle:

a. Whether a gift, incentive, or other item of consideration shall be viewed to affect, or give the appearance of affecting, a dietetics practitioner’s professional judgment is dependent on all factors relating to the transaction, including the amount or value of the consideration, the likelihood that the practitioner’s judgment will or is intended to be affected, the position held by the practitioner, and whether the consideration is offered or generally available to persons other than the practitioner.

b. It shall not be a violation of this principle for a dietetics practitioner to accept compensation as a consultant or employee or as part of a research grant or corporate sponsorship program, provided the relationship is openly disclosed and the practitioner acts with integrity in performing the services or responsibilities.

c. This principle shall not preclude a dietetics practitioner from accepting gifts of nominal value, attendance at educational programs, meals in connection with educational exchanges of information, free samples of products, or similar items, as long as such items are not offered in exchange for or with the expectation of, and do not result in, conduct or services that are contrary to the practitioner’s professional judgment.

d. The test for appearance of impropriety is whether the conduct would create in reasonable minds a perception that the dietetics practitioner’s ability to carry out professional responsibilities with integrity, impartiality, and competence is impaired.

 

Responsibilities to Colleagues and Other Professionals

19. The dietetics practitioner demonstrates respect for the values, rights, knowledge, and skills of colleagues and other professionals.

a. The dietetics practitioner does not engage in dishonest, misleading, or inappropriate business practices that demonstrate a disregard for the rights or interests of others.

b. The dietetics practitioner provides objective evaluations of performance for employees and coworkers, candidates for employment, students, professional association memberships, awards, or scholarships, making all reasonable efforts to avoid bias in the professional evaluation of others.

 

PROCESS FOR CONSIDERATION OF ETHICS ISSUES

In accordance with ADA’s Code of Ethics, a process has been established for consideration of ethics issues. This process defines the procedure for review of and response to ethics complaints, including hearings, disciplinary action, and appeals. The process was approved on June 2, 2009, by the ADA Board of Directors, the House of Delegates, and the Commission on Dietetic Registration.

 

Committee

A three (3)-person committee, comprised of members of ADA and/or CDRcredentialed practitioners, will be appointed to handle all ethics matters. One person will be appointed each year by the president-elect of ADA, the chairperson of CDR, or the speakerelect of the House of Delegates (based on the expired term). Terms of office will be for three (3) years. Terms will be staggered to allow for continuity. The chairship will rotate among the three (3) committee members. The chairship will be awarded to the person moving into the third year of the three (3)-year term of office.

 

The Committee will have authority to consult with subject experts as necessary to conduct its business. The Committee may perform such other educational activities as might be necessary to assist members and credentialed practitioners to understand the Code of Ethics.

 

Ethics Opinions

The Committee may issue opinions on ethics issues under the Code of Ethics on its own initiative or in response to a member’s or credentialed practitioner’s request. These opinions will be available to members and credentialed practitioners to guide their conduct, and will also be available to the public. Situations may be factual or hypothetical, but no names will be disclosed. Ethics Cases

 

Preamble.The enforcement procedures are intended to permit a fair resolution of disputes on ethical practices in a manner that protects the rights of individuals while promoting understanding and ethical practice. The Ethics Committee has the authority and flexibility to determine the best way to resolve a dispute, including educational means where appropriate.

 

1. Complaint

A complaint that a member or credentialed practitioner has allegedly violated the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics must be submitted in writing on the appropriate form to the Ethics Committee.

The complaint must be made within one (1) year of the date that the complainant (person making complaint) first became aware of the alleged violation or within one (1) year from the issuance of a final decision in an administrative, licensure board, or judicial action involving the facts asserted in the complaint.

The complainant need not be a member of ADA nor a practitioner credentialed by CDR.

The complaint must contain details on the activities complained of; the basis for complainant’s knowledge of these activities; names, addresses, and telephone numbers of all persons involved or who might have knowledge of the activities; and whether the complaint has been submitted to a court, an administrative body, or a state licensure board. The complaint must also cite the section( s) of the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics allegedly violated. The complaint must be signed and sworn to by the complainant( s).

 

2. Preliminary Review of Complaint

The chair of the Ethics Committee, legal counsel for ADA, and appropriate staff will review the complaint to determine whether all the required information has been submitted by the complainant and whether an ethics question is involved.

If a complaint is made regarding an alleged violation of the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics and a similar complaint is already under consideration regarding the same individual by a state licensure board of examiners, an administrative body, or a court of law, the Ethics Committee will not process the complaint until a final decision has been issued.

 

3. Response

If the preliminary review determines that the process should proceed, the ADA staff or chair of the Ethics Committee will notify the respondent (person against whom the complaint is made) that a complaint has been made.

The notice will be sent from the staff via certified mail, return-receipt requested.

The respondent will be sent a copy of the complaint, the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics, the Review Process, and the Response to Complaint form. The respondent will have thirty (30) days from receipt of the notification in which to submit a response. The response must be signed and sworn to by the respondent( s).

If the Ethics Committee does not receive a response, the chair of the Ethics Committee or his or her designee will contact the respondent by telephone.

If contact with the respondent is still not made, a written notice will be sent. Failure to reach the respondent will not prevent the Committee from proceeding with the investigation. The response submitted to the Ethics Committee by the respondent, may, upon request by the complainant, be provided to the complainant following the decision of the Committee.

 

4. Ethics Committee Review

The chair of the Ethics Committee will add the complaint and response to the Committee’s agenda, after consultation with legal counsel and appropriate staff. The complaint and the response will be reviewed by the Ethics Committee.

The Committee has broad discretion to determine how to proceed, including, but not limited to, dismissing the complaint, requesting further information from the parties, resolving the case through educational activities, holding a hearing as specified hereafter, or in any other way deemed advisable. The Committee may use experts to assist it in reviewing the complaint and response and determining further action.

At the appropriate time, the Ethics Committee will notify the complainant and the respondent of its decision, which may include the Committee’s preliminary opinion with a request that the respondent take certain actions, including, but not limited to, successful completion of continuing professional education in designated areas, or supervised practice based on the terms to be set forth by the Committee.

The Ethics Committee may also recommend appropriate remedial action to the parties, which if undertaken, would resolve the matter.

The Ethics Committee may recommend, in its discretion, that a hearing be held subject to the other provisions of these procedures.

 

5. Licensure Board Action or Final Judicial or Administrative Action

When the Ethics Committee is informed by a state licensure body that a person subject to the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics has had his or her license suspended or revoked for reasons covered by the Code, the Committee may take appropriate disciplinary action without a formal hearing.

When a person has been finally adjudged or has admitted to committing a misdemeanor or felony as specified in Principle 4 of the Code, the Committee may take appropriate disciplinary action without a formal hearing.

 

6. Hearings

A. General

Hearings shall be held as determined by the Ethics Committee under the following guidelines.

Hearing dates will be established by the chairman of the Ethics Committee. All hearings will be held in Chicago, IL.

The Ethics Committee will notify the respondent and the complainant by certified mail, return-receipt requested, of the date, time, and place of the hearing.

The respondent may request a copy of the file on the case and will be allowed at least one postponement, provided the request for postponement is received by ADA at least fourteen (14) days before the hearing date.

 

B. Conduct of Hearings

The chair of the Ethics Committee will conduct a hearing with appropriate staff and legal counsel present. Individuals who have no conflict of interest will be appointed.

In the event that any Ethics Committee member cannot serve on the hearing panel for any reason, a replacement will be appointed by the representative of the original body that made the appointment, either the ADA president, the CDR chairperson, or the speaker of the House of Delegates as appropriate.

The parties shall have the right to appear, to present witnesses and evidence, to crossexamine the opposing party and adverse witnesses, and to have legal counsel present. Legal counsel for the parties may advise their clients, but may only participate in the hearings with the permission of the chair.

The hearing is the sole opportunity for the participants to present their positions.

Three members of the Ethics Committee shall constitute a quorum. Affirmative vote of two thirds (2/3) of the members voting will be required to reach a decision.

A transcript will be prepared and will be available to the parties at cost.

 

C. Costs

ADA will bear the costs for the Ethics Committee, legal counsel, staff, and any other parties called by ADA. ADA will bear the travel costs and one (1) night’s hotel expenses for the complainant and respondent and one person that each chooses to bring, provided that such person is necessary to the conduct of the hearing as determined by the chair of the Ethics Committee. The Ethics Committee shall issue regulations to govern the payment of these expenses, which shall be incorporated and made part of these procedures.

The respondent and the complainant will be responsible for all costs and fees incurred in their preparation for and attendance at the hearing, except expenses for travel and hotel as stated above.

 

D. Decision

The Ethics Committee will render a written decision specifying the reasons therefore and citing the provision(s) of the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics that may have been violated. The Committee will decide that:

1) the respondent is acquitted;

2) educational opportunities are pursued;

3) the respondent is censured, placed on probation, suspended, or expelled from ADA; and/or

4) the credential of the respondent is suspended or revoked by the CDR of the ADA.

The decision of the Ethics Committee will be sent to the respondent and the complainant as soon as practicable after the hearing.

 

7. Request by Complainant for Review of Respondent's Response

The Ethics Committee will, except where the response contains information that the Committee determines for good reasons should not be shared, grant the request of a complainant to review the response received from the respondent in an ethics case, provided the request is made within thirty (30) days of notification of the final action of the Ethics Committee. The complainant will be required to maintain confidentiality of the documentation and to refrain from sharing it with any other third parties or individuals. The complainant will have twenty (20) days to advise the Ethics Committee as to any comments, concerns, or issues with regard to the respondentfs response, but the Committee shall have no obligation to take further action. The respondent will be notified of the Committeefs action to release the response to the complainant.

A. The materials describing the ethics complaint process, including those materials provided to the complainants and respondents, shall be amended to disclose the fact that a respondentfs response may be made available to the complainant.

 

B. Any request to review the respondentfs response must be submitted in writing (electronic or mail) no later than thirty (30) days after final action by the Committee.

 

C. ADA staff will notify the Ethics Committee of the request and will provide a timeline for addressing it.

 

D. Within five (5) business days of the request being received, the Committee will advise the respondent that the complainant has made the request and is being given access to the response. The requested documentation will be sent to the complainant via express mail to ensure delivery.

 

E. The complainant will be required to commit in writing to maintain the confidentiality of the documentation by signing a statement to this effect.

 

F. Any comments, concerns, or issues with the respondent's response must be communicated to ADA staff within twenty (20) days in writing (electronic or mail). ADA staff will add the complainantfs comments, concerns, or issues onto the agenda of the next Ethics Committee conference call or meeting. The Committee will determine whether further action is necessary and shall communicate its determination to the complainant.

 

G. The complainant will return the documents after review via UPS at the expense of ADA within twenty-five (25) days.


8. Definitions of Disciplinary Action

Censure: A written reprimand expressing disapproval of conduct. It carries no loss of membership or registration status, but may result in removal from office at the national, state, and district levels and from committee membership.

Time frame: Not applicable to the disciplinary action.

 

Probation: A directive to allow for correction of behavior specified in Principle 7 of the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics. It may include mandatory participation in remedial programs (eg, education, professional counseling, and peer assistance). Failure to successfully complete these programs may result in other disciplinary action being taken. It carries no loss of membership or registration status, but may result in removal from office at the national, state, and district levels and from committee membership. Time frame: Specified time to be decided on a case-by-case basis.

 

Suspension: Temporary loss of membership and all membership benefits and privileges for a specified time with the exception of retention of coverage under health and disability insurance. ADA group malpractice insurance will not be available and will not be renewed during the suspension period.

Time frame: Specified time to be decided on a case-by-case basis.

 

Suspension of Registration: Temporary loss of credential and all benefits and privileges for a specified period of time. It may include mandatory participation in remedial programs (eg, education, professional counseling, and peer assistance). At the end of the specified suspension period, membership and registration benefits and privileges are automatically restored.

Time frame: Specified time to be decided on a case-by-case basis.

 

Expulsion: Removal from membership and a loss of all benefits and privileges.

Time frame: May apply for reinstatement after a five (5)-year period has elapsed or sooner if the basis for the expulsion has been removed, with payment of a reinstatement fee. The individual must meet membership requirements in effect at the time of the application for reinstatement.

 

Revocation of Credential: Loss of registration status and removal from registry; loss of all benefits and privileges. Upon revocation, the former credentialed practitioner shall return the registration identification card to CDR.

Time frame: Specified time for reapplication to be decided on a case-by-case basis, but, at minimum, current recertification requirements would need to be met. A credential will not be issued until CDR determines that the reasons for revocation have been removed.

 

9. Appeals

A. General

Only the respondent may appeal an adverse decision to ADA. During the appeals process, the membership and registration status of the respondent remains unchanged.

The ADA president, the chairperson of CDR, and the speaker of the House of Delegates shall each appoint one person to hear the appeal. These individuals shall constitute the Appeals Committee for that particular case. Individuals who have no conflict of interest will be appointed.

 

B. Recourse to the Appeals Committee

To request a hearing before the Appeals Committee, the respondent/appellant shall notify the appropriate staff at ADA headquarters, by certified mail, return-receipt requested, that the respondent wishes to appeal the decision. This notification must be received within thirty (30) calendar days after receipt of the letter advising the respondent/ appellant of the Ethics Committee’s decision.

 

C. Contents

The appeal must be in writing and contain, at a minimum, the following information:

1. The decision being appealed.

2. The date of the decision.

3. Why the individual feels the decision is wrong or was improperly rendered (See E, “Scope of Review”).

4. The redress sought by the individual.

5. The appeal will be signed and sworn to.

If the appeal does not contain the information listed above, it will be returned to the individual who will be given ten (10) calendar days to resubmit. Failure to furnish the required information within ten (10) calendar days will result in the appeal being waived.

 

D. Procedures

Upon receipt of this notification, appropriate staff shall promptly notify the chair of the Appeals Committee that the respondent/appellant is appealing a decision made by the Ethics Committee.

The Appeals Committee chair shall acknowledge the appeal and request a copy of the relevant written information on the case from appropriate staff.

1. Location and participants

a. All appeals hearings will be held in Chicago, IL.

b. The complainant/appellee, the respondent/appellant, and the chair of the Ethics Committee will have the opportunity to participate in the appeals hearing.

c. The parties may have legal counsel present, who may advise their clients, but may only participate in the hearings with the permission of the chair. d. Attendance at the hearing will be limited to persons determined by the chair to have a direct connection with the appeal and appropriate staff and legal counsel.

2. Conduct of the hearing The three (3) parties involved in the appeal will be given the opportunity to state why the decision and/or disciplinary action of the Ethics Committee should be upheld, modified, or reversed.

 

E. Scope of Review

The Appeals Committee will only determine whether the Ethics Committee committed procedural error that affected its decision, whether the Ethics Committee’s decision was contrary to the weight of the evidence presented to it, or whether there is new and substantial evidence that would likely have affected the Ethics Committee’s decision that was unavailable to the parties at the time of the Ethics Committee’s hearing for reasons beyond their control.

In reviewing the decision of the Ethics Committee, the Appeals Committee shall consider only the transcript of the hearing and the evidence presented to the Ethics Committee.

 

F. Record of Hearing

A transcript will be prepared and will be maintained in the case file.

 

G. Decision of Appeals Committee

1. The Appeals Committee shall prepare a written decision stating the reasons therefore. The decision shall be to affirm, modify, or reject the decision and/or disciplinary action of the Ethics Committee or to remand the case to the Ethics Committee with instructions for further proceedings.

2. Decisions of the Appeals Committee will be final.

 

H. Costs

ADA will bear the costs for the Appeals Committee, staff, and legal counsel, and any parties called by ADA. ADA will bear the travel and one night’s hotel expenses for the respondent/ appellant, the complainant/ appellee, and the chair of the Ethics Committee. The Ethics Committee shall issue regulations to govern the payment of these expenses, which shall be incorporated and made part of this procedure.

The respondent/appellant and the complainant/appellee will be responsible for all costs and fees incurred in their preparation for and attendance at the hearing, except expenses for travel and hotel as stated above.

 

10. Notification of Adverse Action

If the respondent is disciplined by the Ethics Committee and does not appeal the decision, the chair of the Ethics Committee will notify the appropriate ADA organizational units, CDR, the affiliate dietetic association, appropriate licensure boards, and governmental and private bodies within thirty (30) days after notification of the final decision.

In the event the respondent ap- 1466 August 2009 Volume 109 Number 8peals a decision to discipline him or her and the Ethics Committee decision is affirmed or modified, similar notification will be made by the chair of the Ethics Committee.

In response to an inquiry about registration status, the Office on Dietetic Credentialing will state only whether a person is currently registered.

 

11. Record Keeping

A. Records will be kept for a period of time after the disposition of the case in accordance with ADAfs record retention policy.

 

B. Information will be provided only upon written request and affirmative response from ADAfs legal counsel.

 

12. Confidentiality Procedures

The following procedures have been developed to protect the confidentiality of both the complainant and the respondent in the investigation of a complaint of an alleged violation of the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics:

A. The need for confidentiality will be stressed in initial communications with all parties.

 

B. Committee members will refrain from discussing the complaint and hearing outside of official committee business pertaining to the complaint and hearing.

 

C. If the hearing on a complaint carries over to the next Committee, the complaint will be heard by the original Committee to hear the complaint. D. Communication with ADA witnesses will be the responsibility of the Committee chair or staff liaison.

 

E. Witnesses who testify on behalf of ADA will be informed of the confidentiality requirements and agree to abide by them.

 

F. The Committee chair will stress the importance of confidentiality at the time of the hearing.

 

G. To ensure confidentiality, the only record of the hearing will be the official transcript and accompanying materials, which will be kept at ADA offices. All other materials that were mailed or distributed to committee members should be returned to ADA staff, along with any notes taken by Committee members.

 

H. The transcript will be available if there is an appeal of the Ethics Committeefs decision and only to the parties, Ethics Committee members, Appeals Committee members, ADA legal counsel, and staff directly involved with the appeal.

 

Recognition is given to the members of the Code of Ethics Task Force for their contributions: Marianne Smith Edge, MS, RD, LD, FADA, Chair; Alice Beth J. Fornari, EdD, RD; Cheryl A Bittle, PhD, RD, LD; Doris Derelian, PhD, JD, RD, FADA; Jana Kicklighter, PhD, RD, LD; Leonard Pringle, DTR; Harold Holler, RD, LDN, ADA Staff; Chris Reidy, RD, CDR Staff; J. Craig Busey, JD, former ADA Legal Counsel. August 2009 œ Journal of the AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION 1467

AAPOR Code of Professional Ethics and Practices (2010)

Organization: American Association for Public Opinion Research Visit Organization Page
Source: AAPOR Code of Professional Ethics and Practice Visit Source Page
Date Approved: 
May 2010

Disclaimer: Please note the codes in our collection might not necessarily be the most recent versions. Please contact the individual organizations or their websites to verify if a more recent or updated code of ethics is available. CSEP does not hold copyright on any of the codes of ethics in our collection. Any permission to use the codes must be sought from the individual organizations directly.

AAPOR Code of Professional Ethics and Practices

We—the members of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and its affiliated chapters—subscribe to the principles expressed in the following Code. Our goals are to support sound and ethical practice in the conduct of survey and public opinion research and in the use of such research for policy- and decision-making in the public and private sectors, as well as to improve public understanding of survey and public opinion research methods and the proper use of those research results.

 

We pledge ourselves to maintain high standards of scientific competence, integrity, and transparency in conducting, analyzing, and reporting our work; establishing and maintaining relations with survey respondents and our clients; and communicating with those who eventually use the research for decision-making purposes and the general public. We further pledge ourselves to reject all tasks or assignments that would require activities inconsistent with the principles of this Code.

 

The Code describes the obligations that we believe all research professionals have, regardless of their membership in this Association or any other, to uphold the credibility of survey and public opinion research.

 

It shall not be the purpose of this Code to pass judgment on the merits of specific research methods. From time to time, the AAPOR Executive Council may issue guidelines and recommendations on best practices with regard to the design, conduct, and reporting of surveys and other forms of public opinion research.

 

I. Principles of Professional Responsibility in Our Dealings with People

 

A. Respondents and Prospective Respondents

 

  1.  We shall avoid practices or methods that may harm, endanger, humiliate, or seriously mislead survey respondents or prospective respondents.
  2.  We shall respect respondents' desires, when expressed, not to answer specific survey questions or provide other information to the researcher. We shall be responsive to their questions about how their contact information was secured. 
  3.  Participation in surveys and other forms of public opinion research is voluntary, except for the decennial census and a few other government surveys as specified by law. We shall provide all persons selected for inclusion with a description of the research study sufficient to permit them to make an informed and free decision about their participation. We shall make no false or misleading claims as to a study’s sponsorship or purpose, and we shall provide truthful answers to direct questions about the research. If disclosure could substantially bias responses or endanger interviewers, it is sufficient to indicate that some information cannot be revealed or will not be revealed until the study is concluded. 
  4.  We shall not misrepresent our research or conduct other activities (such as sales, fundraising, or political campaigning) under the guise of conducting survey and public opinion research. 
  5.  Unless the respondent explicitly waives confidentiality for specified uses, we shall hold as privileged and confidential all information that could be used, alone or in combination with other reasonably available information, to identify a respondent with his or her responses. We also shall not disclose or use the names of respondents or any other personally-identifying information for non-research purposes unless the respondents grant us permission to do so. 
  6.  We understand that the use of our research results in a legal proceeding does not relieve us of our ethical obligation to keep confidential all respondent-identifying information (unless waived explicitly by the respondent) or lessen the importance of respondent confidentiality.

 

 B. Clients or Sponsors

 

  1.  When undertaking work for a private client, we shall hold confidential all proprietary information obtained about the client and about the conduct and findings of the research undertaken for the client, except when the dissemination of the information is expressly authorized by the client, or when disclosure becomes necessary under the terms of Section I-C or III-E of this Code. In the latter case, disclosures shall be limited to information directly bearing on the conduct and findings of the research. 
  2.  We shall be mindful of the limitations of our techniques and capabilities and shall accept only those research assignments that we can reasonably expect to accomplish within these limitations. 

 

C. The Public

 

  1.  We shall inform those for whom we conduct publicly released research studies that AAPOR Standards for Disclosure require the release of certain essential information about how the research was conducted, and we shall make all reasonable efforts to encourage clients to subscribe to our standards for such disclosure in their releases. 
  2.  We shall correct any errors in our own work that come to our attention which could influence interpretation of the results, disseminating such corrections to all original recipients of our content. 
  3.  We shall attempt, as practicable, to correct factual misrepresentations or distortions of our data or analysis, including those made by our research partners, co-investigators, sponsors, or clients. We recognize that differences of opinion in analysis are not necessarily factual misrepresentations or distortions. We shall issue corrective statements to all parties who were presented with the factual misrepresentations or distortions, and if such factual misrepresentations or distortions were made publicly, we shall correct them in as commensurate a public forum as is practicably possible. 

 

D. The Profession

 

  1.  We recognize our responsibility to the science of survey and public opinion research to disseminate as freely as practicable the ideas and findings that emerge from our research. 
  2.  We can point with pride to our membership in the Association and our adherence to this Code as evidence of our commitment to high standards of ethics in our relations with respondents, our clients or sponsors, the public, and the profession. However, we shall not cite our membership in the Association nor adherence to this Code as evidence of professional competence, because the Association does not so certify any persons or organizations. 

 

 

II. Principles of Professional Practice in the Conduct of Our Work

 

A. We shall exercise due care in developing research designs and instruments, and in collecting, processing, and analyzing data, taking all reasonable steps to assure the reliability and validity of results.

 

  1.  We shall recommend and employ only those tools and methods of analysis that, in our professional judgment, are well suited to the research problem at hand. 
  2.  We shall not knowingly select research tools and methods of analysis that yield misleading conclusions. 
  3.  We shall not knowingly make interpretations of research results that are inconsistent with the data available, nor shall we tacitly permit such interpretations. We shall ensure that any findings we report, either privately or for public release, are a balanced and accurate portrayal of research results. 
  4.  We shall not knowingly imply that interpretations should be accorded greater confidence than the data actually warrant. When we use samples to make statements about populations, we shall only make claims of precision that are warranted by the sampling frames and methods employed. For example, the reporting of a margin of sampling error based on an opt-in or self-selected volunteer sample is misleading. 
  5.  We shall not knowingly engage in fabrication or falsification. 6. We shall accurately describe survey and public opinion research from other sources that we cite in our work, in terms of its methodology, content, and comparability.

 

 B. We shall describe our methods and findings accurately and in appropriate detail in all research reports, adhering to the standards for disclosure specified in Section III.

 

 III. Standards for Disclosure

 

Good professional practice imposes the obligation upon all survey and public opinion researchers to disclose certain essential information about how the research was conducted. When conducting publicly released research studies, full and complete disclosure to the public is best made at the time results are released, although some information may not be immediately available. When undertaking work for a private client, the same essential information should be made available to the client when the client is provided with the results.

 

A. We shall include the following items in any report of research results or make them available immediately upon release of that report.

  1.  Who sponsored the research study, who conducted it, and who funded it, including, to the extent known, all original funding sources. 
  2.  The exact wording and presentation of questions and responses whose results are reported. 
  3.  A definition of the population under study, its geographic location, and a description of the sampling frame used to identify this population. If the sampling frame was provided by a third party, the supplier shall be named. If no frame or list was utilized, this shall be indicated. 
  4.  A description of the sample design, giving a clear indication of the method by which the respondents were selected (or self-selected) and recruited, along with any quotas or additional sample selection criteria applied within the survey instrument or post-fielding. The description of the sampling frame and sample design should include sufficient detail to determine whether the respondents were selected using probability or non-probability methods. 
  5.  Sample sizes and a discussion of the precision of the findings, including estimates of sampling error for probability samples and a description of the variables used in any weighting or estimating procedures. The discussion of the precision of the findings should state whether or not the reported margins of sampling error or statistical analyses have been adjusted for the design effect due to clustering and weighting, if any. 
  6.  Which results are based on parts of the sample, rather than on the total sample, and the size of such parts. 
  7.  Method and dates of data collection. 

 

B. We shall make the following items available within 30 days of any request for such materials.

 

  1.  Preceding interviewer or respondent instructions and any preceding questions or instructions that might reasonably be expected to influence responses to the reported results. 
  2.  Any relevant stimuli, such as visual or sensory exhibits or show cards. 
  3.  A description of the sampling frame’s coverage of the target population. 
  4.  The methods used to recruit the panel, if the sample was drawn from a pre-recruited panel or pool of respondents. 
  5.  Details about the sample design, including eligibility for participation, screening procedures, the nature of any oversamples, and compensation/incentives offered (if any). 
  6.  Summaries of the disposition of study-specific sample records so that response rates for probability samples and participation rates for non-probability samples can be computed. 
  7.  Sources of weighting parameters and method by which weights are applied. 
  8.  Procedures undertaken to verify data. Where applicable, methods of interviewer training, supervision, and monitoring shall also be disclosed. 

 

C. If response rates are reported, response rates should be computed according to AAPOR Standard Definitions.

 

D. If the results reported are based on multiple samples or multiple modes, the preceding items shall be disclosed for each.

 

E. If any of our work becomes the subject of a formal investigation of an alleged violation of this Code, undertaken with the approval of the AAPOR Executive Council, we shall provide additional information on the research study in such detail that a fellow researcher would be able to conduct a professional evaluation of the study.