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Potential for occupational exposure to engineered carbon-based nanomaterials in environmental laboratory studies.


By csep - Posted on 07 June 2010

TitlePotential for occupational exposure to engineered carbon-based nanomaterials in environmental laboratory studies.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsJohnson, David R., Methner Mark M., Kennedy Alan J., and Steevens Jeffery A.
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume118
Issue1
Pagination49-54
Date Published01/2010
ISSN Number0091-6765
Abstract

This article describes an experiment examining the potential for laboratory personnel to be exposed to engineered carbon-based nanomaterials (CNMs) in studies aimed at producing conditions similar to those found in natural surface waters. Based on their measurements of fullerenes (C60), underivatized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (raw MWCNT), hydroxylated MWCNT (MWCNT-OH), and carbon black (CB) in air as the nanomaterials were weighed, and then transferred to beakers filled with reconstituted freshwater, and sonicated in deionized water and reconstituted freshwater with and without NOM. Airborne nanomaterials emitted during processing were quantified using two hand-held particle counters that measure total particle number concentration per volume of air within the nanometer range (10-1,000 nm) and six specific size ranges (300-10,000 nm). The researchers found that engineered nanomaterials can become airborne when mixed in solution by sonication, especially when nanomaterials are functionalized or in water containing NOM. This finding indicates that laboratory workers may be at increased risk of exposure to engineered nanomaterials.

URLhttp://ehp03.niehs.nih.gov/article/fetchArticle.action?articleURI=info:doi/10.1289/ehp.0901076
Source Web Site

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20056572?dopt=Abstract

Alternate JournalEnviron. Health Perspect.