You are hereBiblio / On nanotechnology and ambivalence: The politics of enthusiasm

On nanotechnology and ambivalence: The politics of enthusiasm


By csep - Posted on 14 May 2010

TitleOn nanotechnology and ambivalence: The politics of enthusiasm
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsKearnes, Matthew, and Wynne Brian
JournalNanoEthics
Volume1
Start Page131
Issue2
Pagination131-142
Date Published08/2007
Publication LanguageEnglish
ISSN Number1871-4757
Abstract

The majority of public engagement experiments that have been done in the past few years on nanotechnology research and development seek to address the lack of public trust in the benefits of emerging technologies and governments’ and other intuitions’ ability to deal with potential risks that may emerge, by engaging members of the public in a debate about these issues and helping them become part of the decision-making process. This is seen as one way to help the public become more confident about nano research and development, feel engaged in the research, and help them feel that their views are valued and being taken into account. The authors of this paper look at the perceived public ambivalence about nanotechnology as a nested set of enthusiasms and anxieties, and suggest that public engagement might be re-thought to utilize this ambivalence as a creative resource, rather then as the problem to be addressed.

DOI10.1007/s11569-007-0014-7